Thursday, September 19, 2019

Lack of toothbrushing for seniors in nursing homes is a serious health risk

Elderly people in nursing homes often go without a good toothbrushing.

While it might be icky to imagine the horrible way that feels to the oldsters, there are consequences worse than grossness. The mouth and other parts of the oral cavity are a gateway into the body, allowing bacteria inside our bodies that can cause serious disease.


This lack of basic care is big issue for seniors in nursing homes, who number about 1.3 million. It is an example of serious challenges that these facilities face in keeping people healthy. One recent study published in Special Care in Dentistry in 2017 found that only 10.3% of patients admitted to a nursing home over a five-year period utilized dental services within the home at least once during their stay.
A recent investigation by The New York Times into a fatal fungus in nursing homes highlighted one specific difficulty of patients in nursing homes, bringing their plight to the forefront. Even so, it's not exactly captured the attention of the presidential candidates.
I am a dentist and periodontist also trained in microbiology. About 30 years ago, I began to investigate how bacteria in the mouth could affect overall health. My colleagues and I determined, for example, that bacteria that cause pneumonia likely first stick to teeth before being aspirated, or inhaled, into the lungs, especially in vulnerable patients such as those who are intubated in intensive care units or who reside in nursing homes. In one study, we found that the bacteria cultured from the lungs of hospitalized patients with diagnosed pneumonia were identical to those cultured from the teeth of the same patients.
Regards
Baijnath Paswan | Program ManagerDental Forum 2020 | Conferenceseries llc ltdEmail : dentalhealth@globalconferenceseries.net | Contact no: +44 20 360 82897

Wednesday, September 18, 2019

Comparison of the effect of photodynamic therapy and topical corticosteroid on oral lichen planus lesions : 




Researchers conducted this randomized double-blind clinical trial to compare the impact of photodynamic therapy with topical corticosteroid in patients with oral lichen planus. The study sample consisted of 8 patients with bilateral oral lichen planus lesions. To assess the treatment outcomes, Mann-Whitney test was used. In addition to standard methods, photodynamic therapy could be used as an alternative therapy or as a new method for refractory oral lichen planus.


Tuesday, September 17, 2019

Does poor oral health impact brain function?

Perceived stress may detrimentally impact oral health which, in turn, may lead to cognitive decline among specific elderly communities, according to two new studies.Oral health can be a surprisingly good indicator of a person's well-being. Not only can oral diseases reduce a person's quality of life, but they can also increase the risk of other serious conditions.
Researchers have linked gum disease and tooth loss to the occurrence of stroke. An article published in the Journal of Indian Society of Periodontology in 2010 concluded that gum disease could raise a person's risk of heart disease by around 20%. It is, however, necessary to carry out more research in these areas.

Teams at Rutgers University in New Brunswick, NJ, have now focused on a different link — the one between oral health and cognitive decline.
A recently published review of 23 studies found evidence of a relationship between oral health and cognitive aspects, such as memory and executive function.
Now, a team from Rutgers University carried out two separate studies into cognitive decline and perceived stress. Both papers appear in the Journal of the American Geriatrics Society.

The Chinese American focus

The studies focused on Chinese American adults with a minimum age of 60. "Racial and ethnic minorities are particularly vulnerable to the negative consequences of poor oral health," explains XinQi Dong, director of Rutgers University's Institute for Health, Health Care Policy, and Aging Research.
He continues, "Minorities have less access to preventive dental care that is further exacerbated by language barriers and low socioeconomic status. Older Chinese Americans are at particular risk for experiencing oral health symptoms due to lack of dental insurance or not visiting a dental clinic regularly."
Participants for both studies came from the Population Study of Chinese Elderly in Chicago (PINE). The first study quizzed people on their oral health and gave them five cognitive tests to complete.
The second study asked participants if they had ever experienced dry mouth issues. Researchers then asked them to measure their perceived stress, social support, and social strain levels using pre-defined scales.
Social support referred to how often they felt able to open up to or rely on their family members or friends. Researchers defined social strain as how often participants experienced excessive demands or criticism from friends or relatives.

A cognitive link

Out of the more than 2,700 Chinese Americans interviewed, almost half reported tooth-related symptoms. Just over a quarter said they had experienced dry mouth.
There was no significant relationship between gum and cognitive problems. However, researchers believe participants may have been less likely to report gum symptoms due to finding them less problematic.The researchers did find a link between cognitive decline — specifically global cognition and episodic memory decline — and tooth symptoms. Episodic memory issues themselves have a link to the onset of dementia.
The researchers found a similar association in the second study. Those who reported more perceived stress were more likely to report dry mouth. Spousal social support or strain did not reduce this relationship, but support from friends appeared to protect against dry mouth in some way.
"However, the potential overload of such support could be detrimental to oral health outcomes among older Chinese Americans," notes study author Weiyu Mao, assistant professor at the University of Nevada's School of Social Work.

Friday, September 13, 2019

Exchange your ideas, views & research work on Dental Forum 2020

Conference Series LLC Ltd is delighted to invite the Scientists, Dentists, Doctors, researchers & experts from the arena of Dentistry and Oral Health, to attend European Forum on Dental Practice & Oral Health (Dental Forum 2020) on March 06-07, 2020 at Rome, Italy.



Dental Forum 2020 is a specially designed cluster conference which consists of keynote presentations, Oral talks, Poster presentations, Workshops, Panel Discussions and Exhibitions, Young Researcher Forums (YRF), Best Poster Award, Industry academic interactive sessions, and Industry Presentations etc.
Regards

Baijnath Paswan | Program ManagerDental Forum 2020 | Conferenceseries llc ltdEmail : dentalhealth@globalconferenceseries.net | Contact no: +44 20 360 82897


Thursday, September 12, 2019

How babies absorb calcium could be key to treating osteoporosis in seniors

New research reveals the mechanism that allows breastfeeding babies to absorb large amounts of calcium and build healthy bones—a discovery that could lead to treatment for osteoporosis and other bone diseases later in life.


"We build our bone mineral density until we're early adults and then stop, so we think of osteoporosis as a disease of the elderly," said Megan Beggs, a pediatric dietitian and Ph.D. candidate in physiology at the University of Alberta who led the study.
"Really, it's a pediatric disease with consequences in old age, so understanding what's happening at these younger ages, when bones are being built, is critical."
The researchers identified calcium-absorbing channels in the lower two-thirds of the small intestines of breastfed infant mice in a paper published in the journal Cellular and Molecular Gastroenterology and Hepatology.
Previous work had revealed that in adult mammals, most calcium absorption takes place in the upper part of the small intestines, where food spends much less time.
"It seems to be pretty much the opposite is happening in infants," said Beggs.
Babies need to take in massive amounts of calcium in the first year of life to build the cartilage they are born with into the body's 206 bones. This mineral deposition continues at a lower rate until around age 25.
This is the first time the infant mechanism for absorbing calcium has been understood. U of A pediatric nephrologist Todd Alexander, Beggs' Ph.D. supervisor and senior author of the paper, said that's partly because women and children's health has not traditionally been the subject of medical study. He said the research required specially adapted lab equipment to perform experiments on the tiny intestines of genetically altered infant mice.
Alexander said understanding this mechanism could be the first step in reversing diseases that cause weak bones in humans.
"You can imagine that if you have someone who has poor bone health, such as an elderly person or a sick child in neonatal intensive care who has not been able to breastfeed, it would be very useful therapeutically to turn this pathway on for them," Alexander said.
The researchers said their future research will look at the mechanism in pigs, which are even closer physiologically to humans than mice, and they will test their hypothesis that it is a hormone in breast milk that is responsible for regulating the channels.
This Dental Forum 2020 Conference is based on the theme “A Comprehensive access to Modern Dentistry”.  Dental Forum 2020, Rome welcomes proposals and ideas from both Industry & Academia to be presented at this interactive platform.

Regards
Baijnath Paswan | Program ManagerDental Forum 2020 | Conferenceseries llc ltdEmail : dentalhealth@globalconferenceseries.net | Contact no: +44 20 360 82897

Monday, September 9, 2019

The unexpected dangers of gum disease

Gum disease is common and unpleasant, but, according to a growing body of evidence, it could also play a role in a surprising range of seemingly unrelated health problems.



Plaque — a sticky substance that contains bacteria — builds up on teeth. If it is not brushed away, the bacteria can irritate the gums.
The gums may then become swollen, sore, or infected; this is referred to as gingivitis.
In general, gum disease can be treated or prevented by maintaining a good oral health regime.
However, if it is left to develop, it can result in periodontitis, which weakens the supporting structures of the teeth.
Gum disease, which is also called periodontal disease, is widespread. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), almost half of adults in the United States have some degree of gum disease.
The mechanisms behind periodontal disease are relatively well-understood, and newer research shows that this health problem may play a role in the development of a number of other conditions, including Alzheimer's disease, cancer, and respiratory disease.
In this Spotlight, we will cover some of the surprising links between gum disease and disparate health issues.

Friday, September 6, 2019

Can we heal teeth? The quest to repair tooth enamel, nature's crystal coat





Tooth enamel is one of the hardest tissues in the human body. It acts as a protective layer for our teeth, and gives our smile that pearly white shimmer. But when enamel erodes, it can't regrow itself.

In a significant scientific breakthrough, researchers recently discovered a way to regrow human tooth enamel.
Scientists from China have invented a gel that contains mineral clusters naturally found in teeth. In partially acid-damaged teeth, the gel stimulates crystal regrowth to restore tooth enamel back to its original structure.
While the method is yet to be tested on people, one day this could mean saying goodbye to painful needles, the dreaded dentist drill, and even fillings.

What is tooth enamel?

Enamel is the outermost layer of our teeth, and protects our pearly whites from wear and tear. It also insulates us from feeling pain and sensitivity.
When this protective coat erodes, our teeth soften and become vulnerable to developing cavities (holes in the teeth) which may require dental treatment such as fillings.
Tooth enamel contains the same minerals, calcium and phosphate, found in bone. Unlike bone though, enamel contains relatively more mineral, and enamel crystals are arranged in a complex geometrical pattern.
Under a microscope, enamel crystals are shaped like long ribbons, or spaghetti strands. These crystal strands are assembled into clusters, like packets of dry spaghetti, orientated at 60 degrees to each other. The ribbon clusters, which weave together like honeycomb, are known as rods and inter-rods.
When destroyed, this weave is difficult to recreate, because the cells that form enamel die as our teeth emerge from our gums.